Rules of the smartphone

Rule #1: Don’t look at your smartphone in the morning until you get to work.
Peeking at your email or phone messages before you have dressed or had
breakfast will create unnecessary distraction, worry, and stress. If you’re
married with children, it will also prevent you from being engaged with your
family during breakfast. In fact, don’t even look at your smartphone during
the drive to work; again, it would serve no purpose as you can’t—or, at least,
you shouldn’t—be thumb typing during your commute (unless you’re on a train or
bus and you can respond to your phone and email messages).

Rule #2: Don’t look at your smartphone during the day unless you are ready to
act on it. It’s not uncommon for businesspeople to look at their smartphones
as they head into a meeting or just before a conference call. The primary
consequence of doing this is that you will be distracted from your next task.
You will be thinking about what you found on your smartphone instead of
focusing on the task ahead.

Rule #3: Turn off all smartphones during meetings. In fact, every company
should have a “no smartphone” rule for all meetings. There are few things more
irritating, distracting, and productivity-killing than having people at a
meeting looking at and typing into their smartphones. They are clearly not
paying attention to the meeting and, therefore, unable to contribute in any
meaningful way. It also distracts others at the meeting. It wastes time and
prolongs meetings because no one is focusing on the agenda. Quality and
productivity suffer too because the lack of full engagement means that
effective problem solving and decision making will be nearly impossible.

Rule #4: Don’t check your smartphone less than 30 minutes before you go to
bed. If there are calls or emails you think you must respond to you, you will
get to bed later and you’ll get riled up, so you’ll have a harder time falling
asleep. The reality is that, in most cases, they can wait until morning, so
best not to look. At worst, choose a time between 30 and 60 minutes before
bedtime when you take a last look at your smartphone. At best, commit to not
checking your smartphone at all in the evening.

Rule #5: Don’t do your smartphone when you are doing life. In other words,
don’t look at your smartphone if you are interacting with others, doing
something that is supposed to clear your mind of work, such as exercise,
meditation, having a meal, watching a movie, or hanging out with family or
friends.. There is nothing more annoying to family and friends than to be with
you when you are making business calls or responding to email—why are you even
with them if you’re with them in body only? It’s okay to check your smartphone
periodically, but ONLY IF you don’t interrupt more important life stuff and
ONLY IF you are expecting something that you may have to act on quickly

I have a smartphone. My girlfriend has a smartphone. They are often both going
off with emails, (in my case) tweets, texts etc – although during the evenings
it seems to be me more than her. I’m going to try to follow these for a while.

Rule #1: Don’t look at your smartphone in the morning until you get to work.
Peeking at your email or phone messages before you have dressed or had
breakfast will create unnecessary distraction, worry, and stress. If you’re
married with children, it will also prevent you from being engaged with your
family during breakfast. In fact, don’t even look at your smartphone during
the drive to work; again, it would serve no purpose as you can’t—or, at least,
you shouldn’t—be thumb typing during your commute (unless you’re on a train or
bus and you can respond to your phone and email messages).

Rule #2: Don’t look at your smartphone during the day unless you are ready to
act on it. It’s not uncommon for businesspeople to look at their smartphones
as they head into a meeting or just before a conference call. The primary
consequence of doing this is that you will be distracted from your next task.
You will be thinking about what you found on your smartphone instead of
focusing on the task ahead.

Rule #3: Turn off all smartphones during meetings. In fact, every company
should have a “no smartphone” rule for all meetings. There are few things more
irritating, distracting, and productivity-killing than having people at a
meeting looking at and typing into their smartphones. They are clearly not
paying attention to the meeting and, therefore, unable to contribute in any
meaningful way. It also distracts others at the meeting. It wastes time and
prolongs meetings because no one is focusing on the agenda. Quality and
productivity suffer too because the lack of full engagement means that
effective problem solving and decision making will be nearly impossible.

Rule #4: Don’t check your smartphone less than 30 minutes before you go to
bed. If there are calls or emails you think you must respond to you, you will
get to bed later and you’ll get riled up, so you’ll have a harder time falling
asleep. The reality is that, in most cases, they can wait until morning, so
best not to look. At worst, choose a time between 30 and 60 minutes before
bedtime when you take a last look at your smartphone. At best, commit to not
checking your smartphone at all in the evening.

Rule #5: Don’t do your smartphone when you are doing life. In other words,
don’t look at your smartphone if you are interacting with others, doing
something that is supposed to clear your mind of work, such as exercise,
meditation, having a meal, watching a movie, or hanging out with family or
friends.. There is nothing more annoying to family and friends than to be with
you when you are making business calls or responding to email—why are you even
with them if you’re with them in body only? It’s okay to check your smartphone
periodically, but ONLY IF you don’t interrupt more important life stuff and
ONLY IF you are expecting something that you may have to act on quickly

Stolen Lovingly lifted from Jason
Langridge

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